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Saturday, March 20, 2010

Paperback Cover Cavalcade 11

Here's a three-book gallery of covers by Roger Hall.

Calling Doctor Jane by Adeline McElfresh (Corgi T686, 1959) Cover by Roger Hall
She was in love with her future husband, and Doctor Jane Langford eagerly prepared to join him at his remote African medical mission station.
__But then Doctor Paul Hamlin arrived to take over Jane's busy practice. And as they worked side by side, the darkly handsome young doctor made no secret of his growing desire for Jane, his determination to keep her for himself.
__As Jane's warm but errant heart responded to Doctor Paul she was faced with the greatest challenge she had ever known...
__Against the background of the busy, hectic world of modern medicine is told this challenging story of a young, beautiful woman's search for truth and honesty.
Elizabeth Adeline McElfresh (1918- ) was a prolific American romance writer under a variety of pen-names (Jennifer Blair, John Cleveland, Jane Scott, Elizabeth Wesley) who specialised in the Doctor/Nurse romance genre. She also worked as a newspaper journalist for various Indiana newspapers in the 1930s to 1950s and, when the romance market dipped in the 1960s, she became director of public relations for the Good Samaritan Hospital in Vincennes, Indiana.

Nurse With Wings by Marguerite Mooers Marshall (Corgi T674, 1959) Cover by Roger Hall
Anne was engaged to marry Dr. "Staff" Stafford, ambitious young New York doctor who demanded that she give up the career she loved.
__Then, one storm-tossed night, her plane crashed in the Canadian wilderness, and the whole pattern of her life was swept out of her control. For as she fought to save her passengers from the burning wreckage, she found a stranger working skillfully by her side. he was Dr. Paul Roy, a young Canadian doctor.
__Back in New York in Staff's possessive arms Anne Austin tried to forget the quiet masterly young Canadian.
__How this passionate and honest young girl settled one of life's greatest problems and found fulfilment is told in this rich and compelling novel by one of the great novelists of the world of medicine.
Marguerite Mooers Marshall (1887-1964) was an American journalist with the New York Evening World, whose "The Woman of It" column appeared in some sixty or seventy American newspapers. She contributed to many leading magazines and wrote regularly for King Feature Syndicate. She began writing novels regularly in the 1930s. She and her husband, Sidney Walter Dean, whom she married in 1916, enjoyed holidaying in Quebec where they kept a summer chalet; the widowed Mrs. Dean went missing in May 1964 and her body was found a week later in the wooded area of Lac Beauport, north of Quebec City.

Sister Brookes of Byng's by Kate Norway (Corgi T663, 1959) Cover by Roger Hall
Shattered after a broken engagement, Helen Brookes returned to Byng's Hospital determined to throw herself body and soul into her career and let nothing stand in the way.
__But Sister Helen could not silence the promptings of her heart so easily. Despite all her efforts her relationship with wealthy publisher Richard Barnett developed into a warmer friendship than is usual between nurse and patient, a friendship which Richard would have liked to lead to marriage and a life of luxury and ease for Helen as his wife.
__And then her first-sight dislike for the arrogant Resident Surgical Officer Hugh Burton-Hall began to change into affection and even love. But Hugh was married...
__Torn between her duty, the glamour of Richard Barnett's proposals and her unhappy love for Hugh Burton-Hall, Sister Helen almost decided that her return to Byng's was the greatest mistake of her life.
Kate Norway was the popular pen-name of Olive Norton (nee Claydon, 1913-1973) who regularly wrote three hospital romances and two crime novels a year, many appearing under pen-names (Norway, Bess Norton, Hilary Neal). Norton could write from experience as she had studied at the Birmingham Children's Hospital and Manchester Royal Infirmary and was in various nursing posts in the 1930s.

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