Thursday, January 20, 2022

  • 21 Jan. Alan Moore wonders if his stories helped create Donald Trump and QAnon. "The fantastic unbelievable threat is going to be the underground democrat peadophile demons that were suggested by QAnon, and the equally unbelievable superhero saviour that is working behind the scenes to rescue us all will be ‘The Donald’, who’s even got a superhero name."
  • 15 Jan. Chloe Maveal celebrates the Star Wars art of Cam Kennedy. "For any that remain as unconvinced by the Star Wars story in any traditional way of it being told, you can find a new love for it in the pigment-soaked pages of Cam Kennedy’s heart-stopping Star Wars work."
  • 13 Jan. David Sutherland is celebrated after drawing the Bash Street Kids for six decades.
  • 8 Jan. Miracleman will be returning in 2022 as part of the 40th anniversary of his revival by Alan Moore and Garry Leach in Warrior. Marvel will be publishing a hardcover omnibus of the Moore run (uncredited at his request), plus two stories by Grant Morrison and Peter Milligan that appeared in 2014  All-New Miracleman Annual. The omnibus, due September 2022, will have covers by Alan Davies, Kevin Nowlan and Garry Leach.
        The Miracleman story came to a premature end with issue #24, partway through a storyline by Neil Gaiman and Mark Buckingham. #25 was completed but never published due to Eclipse's bankruptcy. A lengthy court battle ensued over who owned the rights to the character and stories, resolved in 2009 and some material was published around 2010/11.
        The Miracleman symbol was introduced on the final page of Timeless #1, the recently published Kang the Conqueror story that will echo across a number of Marvel titles. And Rich Johnson has reported that the Gaiman/Buckingham series is about to reappear, with four issues complete, concluding Miracleman: The Silver Age and entering Miracleman: The Dark Age. Johnson has also revealed that any further new stories featuring MM will be written by Donny (Venom, GUardians of the Galaxy, Thor, etc.) Cates.
  • 8 Jan. Ram V discusses Swamp Thing, Al Ewing and what's next.  "I’ve been doing this work for the past four or five years. I only started writing comics in 2016. 2018/2019 is when I did “These Savage Shores,” and that kind of put me on a lot of people’s watch lists."
  • 7 Jan. A new 96-page hardback special has been announced by Rebellion featuring characters from Battle and Action in eight new stories written by Garth Ennis. Artists include Kevin O'Neill, Keith Burns, Mike Dorey, John Higgins, Chris Burnham, Patrick Goddard and PJ Holden. The stories will feature Skreamer of the Stukas, Hellman of Hammer Force, Glory Rider, Kids Rule OK, Dredger, Nina Petrova (from Johnny Red), Crazy Keller and The Sarge. The Battle Action Special will be available in June.
  • 7 Jan. Lew Stringer responds to recent accusations that The Beano has gone "woke" over changes to the names of Bash Street Kids characters Fatty and Spotty.
  • 2 Jan. Review: The Electrical Life of Louis Wain, starring Benedict Cumberbatch as Louis Wain, the famous cat artist.
  • 31 Dec. A Christmas Day Message from Dave Gibbons and Forbidden Planet. (video, 36m)
  • 31 Dec. Jock is to write & draw the 3-part Batman: One Dark Knight for DC Black Label. "The germ of the idea was Batman chasing EMP across the rooftops of Gotham, and as he's chasing him we see the licks of energy, and it's clear that this guy feeds on it, on energy."
  • 19 Dec. Bash Street's Spotty is to be known as Scotty, the move coming some months after Fatty's name change to Freddy in May. “As Scotty said to his classmates, there’s more to him than his physical characteristics, and that’s true for any child,” says Michael Stirling, head of Beano Studios.
  • 19 Dec. The Comix Experience Graphic Novel Club returns to discuss Enigma with Peter Milligan and Duncan Fegrado. (video, 1hr 42m)
  • 16 Dec. Garth Ennis discussed his career on a panel at C2E2 in Chicago. Comicsbeat staff were taking notes. “On my 19th birthday, I called the office and they gave me a job.”
  • 12 Dec. Interview: Garth Ennis. "Garth Ennis voyages beyond the edge of darkness with the Judge Dredd Megazine's Hawk the Slayer!" (video, 23m)
  • 12 Dec. The 2000AD collection Brink Book 4 by Dan Abnett and INJ Culbard is amongst Graeme McMillan's choices of  the Best Comics of 2021 in Variety. "The latest installment of this British science fiction comic can easily serve as a standalone introduction to the series as a whole, and the sly sense of humor that pervades the “True Detective” meets “The Expanse” set-up of the whole thing."
  • 7 Dec. Terence Dollard interviews Brian Bolland (video, 28m). "Artist Brian Bolland discusses his approach to drawing covers, his influences, and working digitally."
  • 5 Dec. Rachel Cooke chooses her favourite graphic novels of 2021.
  • 4 Dec. Roy Schwatz's Is Superman Circumcised?, a study of the origins of Superman, won the Diagram prize for "oddest book title of the year". “The competition was stiff, but I’m glad I was able to rise to the challenge,” said Schwartz. “I’m sincerely honoured to receive this august literary prize. It’s a great reminder that even serious literature is allowed to be fun.”
  • 4 Dec. Comic artist – best known for his covers for Marvel, DC and Dynamite – John Watson has written and published a fantasy novel, with more to follow.
  • 29 Nov. Neil Gaiman chooses his favourite Desert Island Discs. "Neil Gaiman, writer, shares the eight tracks, book and luxury item he would take with him if cast away to a desert island."
  • 28 Nov. Life imitates art. A school project about Alan Moore and David Lloyd's V For Vendetta results in armed police tearing down posters. "The students — unhappy that their educational experience about the dangerous censorial powers of racist, sexist, homophobic authoritarians was being censored by authorities — staged a protest. While you would think this was a reasonable course of action — the character of V would have likely just blown something up — the administration responded by shutting down in-person schooling and forcing the students to stay home and attend virtual learning classes."
  • 24 Nov. Interview: Michael Moorcock. Elric of Melnibone is celebrating his 60th birthday. "When I first started writing [fantasy], nobody knew what to call it at all. I mean, the publishers didn't know what to call it. They thought that Tolkien was (writing about) a post-apocalyptic nuclear world."
  • 22 Nov. Interview: Rachael Smith. "It was ten years ago, when my therapist suggested that I start drawing, because I told her it was something I loved to do. She suggested that I draw something every day that was good that happened to me, to try to be more positive about life."
  • 18 Nov. John Freeman reports on a huge slate of comic-based characters that are in development at Emanta Studios based on classic DC Thomson characters ranging from Dennis to The Amazing Mr X, and Bunty to Bananaman. “For those who already know them, and new audiences ready to be entertained, we can’t wait to reintroduce the world to Bunty, ‘The Supercats’, ‘Nick Jolly, The Flying Highway Man’, alongside the incredible Beano IP at our disposal,” says Chief Creative Officer Mark Talbot.
  • 15 Nov. Chloe Maveal on Mick McMahon: "With both Ro-Busters and ABC Warriors, he moved onto something more bold in its use of stark black and white, and also more physically blocky, for want of a better word; the heavy physicality of his art in those strips being something that he’d carry back to Dredd when he returned to that strip."
  • 15 Nov. Jock talks Batman: One Dark Knight. "From high above the sweltering summer streets of Gotham, Batman planned to escort the GCPD as the dangerous metahuman super-villain known as E.M.P. was transferred from a holding cell to his permanent home at Blackgate Prison. E.M.P.’s electrical powers posed a threat, but the situation was in hand—until it wasn’t. Now every light in Gotham is out, the police are in disarrayand a broken, bleeding Batman must fight his way to Blackgate, block by block, dragging E.M.P. behind him." (video, 24 mins)
  • 11 Nov. John Freeman spotlights the work of Spanish artist Jaume Rumeu.
  • 5 Nov. Interview: Andi Watson. "I was reading plays by Beckett and Harold Pinter, reading English author Evelyn Waugh, watching Polanski movies and reading the short stories of Dino Buzzati. I have had a thick book of photos of Paris taken by Atget on my shelf for many many years and promised myself I would use it as reference for a graphic novel one day. With The Book Tour I had an idea that would allow me to use that book."
  • 2 Nov. The Tate's Hogarth and Europe exhibition. "It is easy to see why Hogarth is so often positioned as the founding father of a particular strand of art which is essentially British: figurative, storytelling and not afraid to poke fun at itself."
  • 1 Nov. Book Palace have announced a new book for early 2022, The A to Z of British Newspaper Strips by Paul Hudson, which will feature 680 entries over 320 pages.
  • 1 Nov. Worthy of your support:  The Most Important Comic Book On Earth. Alan Moore, Taika Waititi, Lucy Lawless and Peter Gabriel all in one place!
  • 1 Nov. Bryan Talbot's The Legend of Luther Arkwright has a publication date—July 2022. "Set fifty years after previous events, The Legend of Luther Arkwright sees Luther pursued across multiple historically divergent parallel worlds, both utopian and dystopian, and facing a far superior adversary. Arkwright battles to save humanity from mass destruction; his only edge is his experience and force of will."
  • 1 Nov. A new book, The Bestall Book, celebrating the art of Alfred Bestall is to be published by The Friends of Rupert Bear, with a signing by another Rupert artist, John Harrold, on 14 November 2021 at Lewes Town Hall, Sussex.
  • 31 Oct. Interview: David Roach interviewed by John Freeman for the Lakes International Comic Arts Festival (video, 1hr 1m)
  • 30 Oct. Interview: Si Spurrier. "I find stories tend to come together bit-by-bit, like solar systems forming from clouds of gas and dust, rather than like a bolt from the blue."
  • 30 Oct. Interview: Monty Nero. "Being creative keeps me centered, and a lot of my thoughts and anger at the world go into Death Sentence."
  • 30 Oct. Beano: The Art of Breaking the Rules exhibition review. "Like many, I gave up on The Beano as a surly twelve-year old ready for the more "grown-up" delights of Marvel and 2000 AD, and so was surprised by how many times I laughed out loud."
  • 22 Oct. Pat Mills puts on a hat and sits amongst some rocks to promote his new book Kiss My Axe, the ultimate history of Slaine, which has now reached saga's end. "Welcome to the Wound Feast!"
  • 21 Oct. Neil Gaiman's The Ocean at the End of the Lane is being staged in the West End. "'I knew it was going to be good, but I didn’t know it was going to be magic,' Gaiman laughs, recalling the original staging of his monster-riddled, grief-stricken story at the Dorfman theatre. The sellout production was supposed to transfer last year, but the pandemic got in the way. Now the team are preparing to install the vastness of an ocean in the Duke of York’s Theatre."
  • 20 Oct. Beano: The Art of Breaking the Rules exhibition review. "Cause and effect, the relentless surge of one thing leading to another, exemplified by the great Leo Baxendale’s drawings of the Bash Street Kids, is complemented by Swiss duo Fischli and Weiss’s 1987 film The Way Things Go, with its studio experiment of burning tyres trundling down ramps, things whacking other things, pendulum swings and constant round of calamitous interactions."
  • 16 Oct. Interview: Rob Williams (video, 58m)
  • 14 Oct. Sophie Shevardnadze interviews Alan Moore for Russia Today (video, 27m). "It’s thanks to Alan Moore that comics have ceased to be just funny books with pictures – and instead have become a distinct genre with its own philosophy and culture."
  • 9 Oct. Barry Windsor Smith has been inducted into the Harvey Awards Hall of Fame.
  • 7 Oct. Interview: Kek-W's 'Wiz War'.  "I wrote an outline for a possible one-pager while, bizarrely, sitting around for a few hours in hospital waiting to be anaesthetised for an operation. Most of the gags in that outline ended up in the final strip."
  • 5 Oct. Interview: Si Spurrier, on The Rush: "Of all the great Bonanza Kings, those lucky few who became insanely wealthy in a flash, who thought nothing of spending a fortune every night in the bars and brothels of Dawson, almost all ended up destitute. Some made and lost several fortunes in a row. They just couldn’t keep the gold. Yet all of them, later in life, remembered this strange dreamlike period with fondness. Like they’d gone through a fiery crucible and come out stronger. Like they’d survived a war."5 Oct. Interview: Dave McKean talks Raptor (video, 2hr 4m).
  • 3 Oct. Interview: Roger Langridge on Pandora Perfect: "There’s a more complex plot in Mystery Moon, certainly – a benefit of having the luxury of space to do that. And the stakes are a bit higher. A longer story seems to require a shift of gears."
  • 3 Oct. Interview: Ian Edginton and D'Israeli talk 'Scarlet Traces: Storm Front'. "Matt (D’israeli) and I have been able to tell the story we want at our own pace rather than if it had been an American-style series or mini-series, if anything, it’s analogous to a television series versus a movie. As well as the primary storyline, we’ve been able to take time to give secondary and even tertiary characters a chance to shine. They’re not just ‘walk-on’ parts, they have an inner life and add a richness and context to the story than if you just focused on the heroes all the time."
  • 3 Oct. Interview: Rob Williams, Arthur Wyatt and Jake Lynch.  "The Hard Way is basically The Red Queen having had enough of Maitland going after her crime empire, so she hires a ‘fixer’ to go big on the assassination front, by hiring a team of the best mercenary killers around. It’s sort of a reverse Dirty Dozen."
  • 2 Oct. Interview: Frank Quitely (video, 2hr 22m) 
  • 26 Sep. Interview: Brian Bolland (video,  1hr 45m)
  • 26 Sep. Interview: Simon Bisleypart 1, part 2. "I had parents and family gathering around my art when I was too young to understand why they cared so much — just scrawling on paper and the walls and shit and they loved it. They said [in falsetto] “Oh Simon those are great! So talented!” So obviously I did get steered towards doing college later on and managed to do a bit of a foundation course designed for an art degree but…I mean, I decided to start working for 2000 AD instead."
  • 24 Sep. David Kunzle on The Rebirth of the English Comic Strip: A Kaleidoscope, 1847-1870. "Author David Kunzle calls this period a “rebirth” because of the preceding long hiatus in use of the new genre, since the Great Age of Caricature (c.1780–c.1820) when the comic strip was practiced as a sideline." (video, 1hr59m)
  • 22 Sep. Rebellion are to publish their first new weekly newsstand comic since the acquisition of 2000AD, and it will be... Monster Fun! "This is a huge deal for us ... it represents a major investment in rebuilding what was once taken for granted here, a thriving newsstand comics industry that supported literacy efforts while also imbuing a love of comics in generations of kids. Right now, graphic novels for children are absolutely booming – and we believe there’s a huge untapped market for good comics for kids. For too long, newsstands have been dominated by tie-in titles with a bit of plastic tat stuck to the front but with little or no decent reading content – we’re aiming to change that."
  • 14 Sep. Simon Furman admits that writing 'The Leopard From Lime Street' for the upcoming Monster Fun Hallowe'en special is a career high.
  • 11 Sep. Interview: Peter Milligan. "We’re bombarded by information and news. But most people — me included — are so stupid we don’t have the brains to process that information. And this makes us unhappy — or at least, more stupid."
  • 11 Sep. Alcohol regulators in North Carolina have banned Flying Dog brewery from selling one of its beers in the state because they have deemed the label "inappropriate" and "in bad taste". The label in question is a cartoon by Ralph Steadman.The Maryland-based brewery is suing the North Carolina Alcohol Beverage Control.
  • 10 Sep. The Dead Boy Detectives, created by Neil Gaiman, might be coming to TV in their own show. HBO have ordered a pilot, written by Steve Yockey, and produced by Jeremy Carver and Berlanti Productions for Warner Bros Television. The two characters are shortly to appear in the third season of Doom Patrol on HBO, but the two actors (Sebastian Croft and Ty Tennant) are not connected (so far) with the pilot.
  • 8 Sep. Tom Shapira looks at Garth Ennis's work on The Punisher. "In the grim figure of Frank Castle, soldier and mass murderer, he has found his voice. That is because Ennis doesn’t write about vigilantism, or personal trauma; Ennis writes about America, about a country that exists in a constant state of war but wants to pretend that nothing happens within its shores."
  • 5 Sep. A Georgian-era portrait of the richest woman in the world by William Hogarth is to be exhibited at the Tate. The curators of "Hogarth and Europe" will "be bringing together more than 60 of the famous artist’s greatest works, including favourites such as Marriage A-la-Mode (1743), A Rake’s Progress (1734) and Gin Lane (1751), to show them alongside works by his contemporaries on the continent."
  • 5 Sep. Susanna Clarke of Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell fame claims "Neil Gaiman's The Sandman taught me to be courageous in writing."
  • 4 Sep. Interview: Peter Milligan. "The fear that these hideous creatures could form out of the ether with a spine-chilling Skreeeee  informs most of the story and the characters’ actions."
  • 4 Sep. Al Ewing has been caught up in the fallout from criticism of artist Joe Bennett.
  • 1 Sep. Interview: Peter Milligan and Sally Cantarino. "The pandemic itself didn’t play a huge part in the birth of Human Remains, it was more how I saw people change because of it. That’s what struck me and I think moved me."
  • 31 Aug. The alluring noir art of Sean Phillips. "If [John] Smith had been Phillips’ ideal collaborator for the earlier part of his career— creating increasingly atmospheric, intentionally outrĂ© stories that allowed Phillips the opportunity to play without limits—then Brubaker was (and remains) Phillips’ perfect partner for their current period. From Sleeper onwards, it was clear the two share sensibilities: aesthetic, sure — both are fans of film noir and its attendant visual cues, from cigarette smoking femme fatales to specific lighting and framing choices in tense emotional moments."
  • 31 Aug. Grant Morrison, Superman and the Bomb. "There are many rabbit holes we need to dive into in order to fully appreciate the implications of what is being said, but chief among them is the fact that the Bomb (and Superman, for that matter) are much larger than a set of shapes hammered together."
  • 31 Aug. Interview: Eddie Campbell (video, 1hr 50m)
  • 27 Aug. Video of Brian Bolland and Trevor Bailey on Night Network, 12th March 1988 (8m30s), and Pat Mills and Steve Yeowell on Express! from 9th May 1992 (3m). Posted on Facebook by Gareth Randall.
  • 26 Aug. Alan Moore asks for your continued support of Extinction Rebellion. "This is the most vital issue that is confronting all of us at the present and we should all do everything that we can to put our shoulders to the wheel and help with this."
  • 25 Aug. Interview: Annie Parkhouse, letterer. "Comics were seen as ephemera and there was no time to be very fussy. Now, it's very easy to go over, and over what you've done to get it to read a bit better. I sometimes take a page apart 2 or 3 times until it's how I want it."
  • 16 Aug. Picturing Girlhood is a keynote by Julia Round. "Through a study of Misty and Spellbound, Round related possession to emotive, gothic motifs particularly with regard to social interactions, friendships, power and isolation. The research presented focused on the symbolic ways in which the comics represent possession, the kinds of effects associated with it and the extent to which possession forms a relationship between possessor and possessed." (video, 49m)
  • 14 Aug. Comic-Con 2021: Charles Vess's Art of Stardust, with Neil Gaiman (video, 45m)
  • 14 Aug. Interview: Rian Hughes discusses The Black Locomotive (video, 15m)
  • 10 Aug. Interview: Dave Heeley and Andrw Sawyers of The 77. "No-one, least of all the team behind it expected the77 project to be so popular. Both the fan and comics creative communities have rallied behind it and helped forge something that I feel is truly special."
  • 9 Aug.  Marvel and DC face a backlash over payments to comic creators over their movies: Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons "had a right to a share of merchandise profits [on Watchmen]; DC produced merch, classified it as “promotional items” and told Moore and Gibbons they weren’t owed anything."
  • 7 Aug. Review: Grandville L'Integrale by Bryan Talbot, reviewed by John Freeman
  • 6 Aug. "Jed Mercurio has mastered the art, and science, of keeping audiences deeply invested in his intricate, web-like plots." An interview with Jed Mercurio, Prasanna Puwanarahah and Coke Navarro about the graphic novel thriller, Sleeper. Mercurio's choice of title has annoyed one of his fans... Ed Brubaker's first major project with Sean Phillips was Sleeper, which has been available in various hardcover and trade collections for the past 18 years, and has been under consideration by Hollywood A-listers (Tom Cruise, Ben Affleck, Sam Raimi). Says Brubaker, "Somehow no one in the entire comics industry had heard about this book of his until it was already at the printer. Needless to say, WB owns the copyright and trademark to ‘Sleeper’ as a series of graphic novels (and TV and film, I believe) and obviously they were more than concerned. So from what I understand there are a lot of legal things happening with them and the other publisher right now.”
  • 6 Aug. Interview: Doug Braithwaite and others discuss Icon and Rocket: "Living in the UK, I’ve never seen anything like this before... And I think the timing of this project couldn’t be better."
  • 3 Aug. Podcast: Dredd or Dead is a new Judge Dredd podcast looking back at the earliest Dredd tales as they appeared in the first volume of Judge Dredd Case Files.
  • 2 Aug. Interview: Bryan Talbot. On The Legend of Luther Arkwright: "We were hoping it was going to come out in October this year, which means I should have finished it in March, or something like that. I’m still inking it. I’ve got about sixty odd pages to ink. It got pushed back to summer, next year."
  • 1 Aug. Interview: Julian Baum, model maker and photographer who worked on 'Dan Dare' and 'Doomlord' in the Eagle in its photo-story days.
  • 1 Aug. The Phoenix has reached its 500th issue, and it has been released as a free digital download.
  • 28 Jul. The Graphic Novel Revisited was a panel hosted by the American Library Association featuring Eddie Campbell (1hr 18m).
  • 27 Jul. Amongst this year's Eisner Award winners is Sean Phillips who, along with Ed Brubaker, won Best New Graphic Novel for the western neo-noir Pulp. Neil Gaiman was inducted into the Will Eisner Hall of Fame.
  • 26 Jul. The Show by Alan Moore and director Mitch Jenkins is to be screened in the US and UK ahead of a Blu-Ray release.
  • 26 Jul. ComicCon held a virtual convention over the weekend with a number of panels hosted by Titan's Andrew Sumner introduced panels featuring Max Allan Collins (53m), Doctor Who (41m), Blade Runner (45m), Black Panther: Tales of Wakanda (42m), V.E. Schwab (48m) and The Art of Stardust with Charles Vess and Neil Gaiman (44m).
  • 26 Jul. How we made Viz. Interviews with Simon Donald and Chris Donald.
  • 18 Jul. Interview: Peter Milligan.
  • 12 Jul. If you're a fan of Shift comic, you can now pre-order the one-off Brawler Special which has a line-up of top talent.
  • 8 Jul. Word Balloon interviews Pat Mills (video, 1hr 37m).
  • 7 Jul. A recently purchased copy of Eagle #1 turned out to be Hulton's office copy with payments pencilled onto the margins.
  • 1 Jul. The film rights have been optioned for Bryan Talbot's The Tale of One Bad Ra30 Jun. Forbidden Planet TV has a batch of new interviews: Garth Ennis on Batman: Reptilian, Ben Aaronovich & Andrew Cartmel on Rivers of London: Body Work (Deluxe Writers Edition) and Val McDIarmid & Kathryn Briggs on Resistance (videos, up to 20m).
  • 30 Jun. Interview: Andi Watson (podcast, 1hr 28m).
  • 30 Jun. Amazon has announced that there will be a second season of Good Omens, based on the novel by Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett and starring Michael Sheen and David Tennant. The six-episode series will begin filming later this year.
  • 29 Jun. Tucked away among the nominees for British Podcast Awards 2021 is the Dirk Maggs adaptation of The Sandman in the "Acast Moment Of The Year" catagory.
  • 27 Jun. Commando celebrates its 60th anniversary.
  • 24 Jun. The late Alan Austin wrote a book about his life as a collector and a comic and book dealer, now published as Comics Unlimited, available now via Amazon. Nigel Brown has also published a collection of Alan's short stories under the title The Adventures of Bernie Burrows, Bookseller, which is also available from Amazon.
  • 24 Jun. Interview: Ian Kennedy.
  • 16 Jun. DTT has details of publishing plans by Anderson Entertainment to reprint classic comic strip starting with Gerry Anderson's UFO adaptations in Countdown.
  • 9 Jun. Congrats to British creators among the nominees for Eisner Awards this year, including David Roach, Andi Watson, Steven Appleby, Sean Phillips and Al Ewing.
  • 9 Jun. An early behind the scenes peek at Netflix's The Sandman with Neil Gaiman (video, 2 mins).
  • 6 Jun. An exhibition of works by Tove Jansson, creator of the Moomins, opens at Walthamstow wetlands this month, and the biopic Tove is released on 9 July.
  • 3 Jun. Mark Millar discusses his latest movies and Netflix shows, including The Magic Order, American Jesus, Prodigy and Reborn (with Sandra Bullock), plus a number of other non-Netflix shows, many of them delayed by the pandemic (video, 12 mins).
  • 1 Jun. Duncan Jones discusses his graphic novel, Modi.
  • 1 Jun. Hannah Berry is one of the authors supporting the idea of royalty payments for secondhand books.
  • 27 May. Netflix have added twelve more actors to the cast of their adaptation of Neil Gaiman's The Sandman.
  • 27 May. Editor Matt Smith has been slipping covert messages into the indicia of 2000 AD for sixteen years.
  • 24 May. Interview: Paul Cornell.
  • 20 May. Interview: John McCrea (video, 53 mins).
  • 13 May. At home with Darryl Cunningham (video, 5 mins).
  • 13 May. The Tintin Estate has lost its legal battle against Xavier Marabout, who used the character in mashups with Edward Hopper art.
  • 12 May. Interview: Barry Windsor Smith.
  • 12 May. Interview: Barrie Tomlinson (video, 28 mins).
  • 8 May. Interview: Keith Richardson discusses Rebellion's Treasury of British Comics.
  • 6 May. Interview: Dave McKean.
  • 6 May. Barry Windsor Smith's new graphic novel, Monster, reviewed.
  • 5 May. Posy Simmonds helps celebrate the Guardian's 200th birthday.
  • 5 May. Interview: Rachael Smith, talks Quarantine Comix (podcast).
  • 3 May. Alan Moore has signed a six-book deal with Bloomsbury, consisting of a short story collection, Illuminations (due 2022), they describe as "dazzlingly original and brimming with energy", and a five-book fantasy series, Long London, which begins in 1949 and moves to "a version of London just beyond our knowledge". Bloomsbury say iit "promises to be epic and unforgettable, a tour-de-force of magic and history”. The first book is to appear in 2024.
  • 2 May. Len Deighton's novels are about to be reissued, but he is also remembered for his comic cookery strips for The Observer.
  • 30 Apr. Interview: Mark Millar.
  • 29 Apr. Michael Portillo looks at the work of artist W. Heath Robinson during a visit to Hatch End (video, first nine or so minutes).
  • 29 Apr. Comic artist Christian Ward has a garden makeover in the BBC's Garden Rescue (video, 30 mins)
  • 15 Apr. Interview: Hannah Berry.
  • 9 Apr. Interview: Paul Goodenough.
  • 3 Apr. M. R. (aka Mike) Carey's The Book of Koli received a Special Citation at the 2021 Philip K. Dick Awards.
  • 31 Mar. Starz may have cancelled American Gods with Season Three, but Neil Gaiman says the show will return.
  • 29 Mar. Scholastic and author Dav Pilkey are withdrawing a graphic novel — Ook and Gluk: Kung-Fu Cavemen from the Future — due to its "harmful racial stereotypes and passively racist imagery.
  • 25 Mar. Doris V. Sutherland looks at three recently published British anthology comics, Spacewarp, Shift and The 77.
  • 24 Mar. SyFy's Resident Alien, based on the comic by Peter Hogan and Steve Parkhouse has been renewed for a second season.
  • 24 Mar. Waitrose is to stop stocking children's magazines that contain disposable toys as a result of a campaign led by 10-year-old Welsh schoolgirl, Skye Neville.

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