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Saturday, February 20, 2010

Charles Garvice

(* Reposted from 7 February to take in a new bibliography and some cover scans for books I'd forgotten I had.)

Charles Garvice was one of the most popular authors of his era—that era being roughly 1900-1920, when he was the Dan Brown of his day, producing novels of no great literary value that went down a storm with the reading public. Most of them were romances, Garvice churning out dozens upon dozens of books, which had sold some six million copies worldwide by 1911. The Times noted that "He is credited, and probably rightly, with a larger circulation than any purveyor of fiction, his remarkable success being due to a persistent industry and an unfailing ability to gauge the tastes of the greatest possible number." Walter Grierson, General Manager of Newnes, revealed in 1914 that Garvice's books were selling at the rate of a million copies a year in England, but claimed that he "has almost no sale at all in the United States," a claim I would suggest was wrong by some margin.

The reviewer for 20th Century Romance Authors certainly found that Garvice had more going for him than some Victorian romantic novelists: "Garvice had an unusual ability to weave fast-paced, intricate, and believable plots that do not need to rely on coincidence to succeed. Missing jewels or treasures are combined with missing or lost heiresses. His plots usually centre on the hero of the story, and the action is told from his viewpoint. He is often from a titled family and he usually succeeds to the title or is reinstated into his father's good graces."

Garvice offered his own formula for success to R. D. Blumenfeld, who, in In the Days of Bicycles and Bustles, recorded:
I have from Charles Garvice his secret of success in the making of a popular novel designed to cause every cook and housemaid in Europe and America to weep copiously. He says: "First take a wicked Earl; then an innocent village maiden; next some irate parents, a background of soldiers and sailors, a family solicitor and an elopement scene; a church door; snow falling, detectives, and finally Villainy defeated and Virtue triumphant. There's a firm in New York who would take one of these novels a week if I could furnish it. But, alas! I can only do about six a year!
He clearly had wider appeal than cooks and housemaids: a survey of requests for books from the 550 soldiers recovering at Endell Street Military Hospital in 1916 showed that Garvice was amongst the favorites, alongside Nat Gould and Baroness Orczy.

After a prolific and very successful career, Garvice died from a cerebral haemorrhage at 10 p.m. on 1 March 1920 after lying in a coma for eight days.

The Miscellany column of The Manchester Guardian (4 March 1920) accurately summed up Garvice when it said "His books will be forgotten but his place will never be vacant. To each generation its own Garvice." I'm not sure who you would cast in the Garvice role for my generation: Harold Robbins, perhaps? Later contenders would have to include Stephen King, Michael Crichton and, today's Garvice, Dan Brown.

What is surprising is that so little seems to be known about his early career. As someone raised the subject of Garvice recently, it seemed that a little exploring was in order.

The Dictionary of National Bibliography offers the following:
Garvice, Charles Andrew (1850–1920), writer, was baptized on 18 September 1850 at St Dunstan and All Saints' Church in Stepney, London, the son of Andrew John Garvice, and his wife, Mira. Little else is known of his family origins and personal life. Obscurity envelops the formative phase in the career of an author who became a publishing phenomenon—‘the most successful novelist in England’, according to Arnold Bennett in 1910. There is no record of his marriage, although he had married by 1873, when he dedicated his d├ębut publication, Eve: and other Verses, to his wife; they had two sons and five daughters. Possibly, Garvice had married abroad, as in the preface to Eve he says that he ‘scribbled on foreign steam-boats and in railway carriages’. He also alludes to a struggling existence, including, perhaps, a bereavement: ‘Most of them [the verses] were written at midnight when the hand was too weary to write and the brain to forge stronger work; some few were born under the cloud of a heavy sorrow.’.
We can add a little to this. He was actually born on 24 August 1850—this from the baptismal record which not only notes his baptism date but the day he was born, too. His parents address at the time of baptism was given as 16 Aston Terrace, Lime House, and dad was a builder

His father, Andrew John Garvice, the son of Thomas and Maria Garvice, married Mira Winter in Gravesend, Kent, in 1848. Andrew John Garvice was born in London on 9 August 1816 and baptised on 17 November at St. Dunston and All Saints in Tower Hamlets, as was his son 34 years later. I believe the couple had a son, Andrew Joseph Garvice, born 2Q 1848 in Gravesend who died 3Q 1849.

Andrew, Mea (sic) and Charles A. Garvice, are in the 1851 census at 16 Aston Street, Saint Anne, Limehouse, Tower Hamlets. Andrew Garvice's occupation was listed as bricklayer (which was also his occupation in 1841 census). Misspellings make tracing the Garvice family very tricky: on Find My Past they are listed as Garvies and on Ancestry, Andrew's wife is given as Alice! Andrew (his death listed as Andrew Garvico) died in late 1851. His widow does not appear on the 1861 census and it is possible that she is the Mary Garvice who (re-)married in the City of London in 1851.

I believe Charles is subsequently listed as Charles Henry Garvice in the 1861 census, aged 10, born Stepney, London, and then a scholar at a school in Mill Road, Bexley, Kent, run by Samuel Collins Barber. This is a little speculative but the 1871 census also lists Garvice (listed as C. A. Garvice) as born in Stepney. By then, Garvice, his occupation described as bookseller, was living with his uncle Joseph Winter (a retired licensed victualler) at 11 The Terrace, Woodford, Essex.

Garvice moved to Hornsey and was married in 1872 to Elizabeth Jones, banns having been published in June and July 1872; the record was subsequently lost from sight because of a spelling error—he is listed as Garbice! Charles and Elizabeth had eight children between 1873 and 1885.
  • Vivien Garvice, b. Cookham, Berkshire, 1873; m. Ernest Allen Stapledon, 1898; d. Northam, Devon, 1958
  • Chudleigh Garvice, b. Cookham, 12 Jan 1875; d. Alexandria, Egypt, 23 Mar 1921 [a biographical sketch can be found here]
  • Muriel Mary Garvice, b. Cookham, 1877; d. Bristol, 1915
  • Beatrix Garvice, b. Weybridge, Surrey, 1878; m. Clifford Henry Bird, 1905
  • Violet Garvice, b. Weybridge, 1881; m. Benwell Harold Bird, 1905
  • Winifred Garvice, b. Weybridge, 10 Feb 1882; d. Bideford, Devon, 1969
  • Olive Garvice, b. Weybridge, 1884; d. London, 1924 [supposedly aged 38]
  • Basil Kendale Garvice, b. Northam, Devon, 18 Aug 1885; lived in Canada from 1906; m. Margery R. Cossentine, 21 Jul 1914; 2nd m. Margaret Isabel Crichton Innes, 5 Oct 1940; d. Ladysmith, B.C., 9 Mar 1964
The Garvices first lived at The Retreat, Cookham, Berkshire, where Charles wrote his first novel, Maurice Durant (1875). At the time of the 1881 census, Garvice and family were living at The Chestnuts, Weybridge, Charles' occupation listed as novelist/journalist. By 1891 they were living at Boat Hyde, Northam, Devon, Charles being described as author/journalist/dramatist. By 1901, they had moved to Moorlands, Bradworthy, Devon. Garvice had the house built for himself, according to the local Bradworthy News magazine. A column by Cecil Collacott (November 2000) notes that Garvice also build Little Silworthy in Putford. "At the latter place he experimented with farming and wrote his only non-fiction book A Farm in Creamland."

Moorlands

Although he considered himself a novice farmer, Garvice became President of the Farmers' and Landowners' Association. He was also later chairman of the executive of the Authors' Club.

When he died in 1920, his address was 4 Maids of Honour Row, Richmond, Surrey. He left a gross estate valued at £71,049 6s. 9d. (net £67, 202 6s. 4d.), the majority going to his wife, with bequests to his two sons. Garvice had said, in answer to someone asking if he would like one day to write something that gave him lasting fame, that he did not write for fame but for money. He certainly made money and time has shown that his fame lasted only as long as the succession of bestsellers arrived on the bookshelves.

PUBLICATIONS

Note: the following checklist is a bit of a mess. I'm usually reasonably confident of the bibliographies that are posted to Bear Alley, but this one involves dozens of books published in cheap, often undated editions, or as part of series that have only been poorly indexed. This, coupled with the minefield that is Worldcat, has meant I've listed multiple editions for some titles as I'm uncertain which came first. As a first stab at this, I think it improves on a listing compiled for 20th Century Romance & Historical Writers, published in 1994, but there's still a long way to go before it would be called definitive.

Novels
Maurice Durant. London, A. Smith, 3 vols., 1875; New York, Ogilvie, n.d.; in 2 vols., as The Eyes of Love, New York, Street & Smith (New Eagle ser. 347), n.d., and The Hearts of Youth, New York, Street & Smith (new Eagle ser. 348), n.d.
'Twixt Smile and Tear. New York, G. Munro, 1887.
Her Ransom. New York, F. M. Lupton (Chimney Corner ser. 31), n..d.; New York, Street & Smith (Eagle Library 50), Feb 1898; as Her Ransom; or, Paid For!, Chicago, M. A. Donohue, n.d.
Claire. New York, F. M. Lupton (Chimney Corner ser. 33), c.1890; as Claire; or, The Mistress of Court Regina, New York, J. S. Ogilvie (Charles Garvice 2), 1898; New York, G. Munro’s Sons, 1899.
Lorrie; or, Hollow Gold. New York, F. P. Lupton (Chimney Corner ser. 51), n.d.; New York, Street & Smith (Eagle Library 85), 1898; London, Hodder & Stoughton, 1910.
Her Heart's Desire. New York, F. M. Lupton (Chimney Corner ser. 58), n.d.; New York, Street & Smith (Eagle Library 41), 1897; London, Sands, 1900.
Leslie's Loyalty; or, His Love So True. New York, F. M. Lupton (Chimney Corner ser. 62), 18??; New York, G. Munro’s Sons, 1898; Chicago, M. A. Donohue, 1900; London, Hodder & Stoughton, 1911; New York, Street & Smith (New Eagle ser. 17), n.d.; as His Perfect Trust, New York, Street & Smith (Eagle Library 69), 1898?; in 2 vols., as His Perfect Trust, Cleveland, Arthur Westrbook, c.1910, and Her Love So True, Cleveland, Arthur Westbrook, 1910.
A Passion Flower. New York, F. M. Lupton (Chimney Corner ser. 68), n.d.; London, Hodder & Stoughton, 1910.
Sweet Cymbeline. New York, F. M. Lupton (Chimney Corner ser. 74), n.d.; London, Newnes, 1911; New York, Street & Smith (New Eagle ser. 102), n.d.
A Wilful Maid. New York, F. M. Lupton (Chimney Corner ser. 88, n.d.; New York, Street & Smith (Eagle ser. 95), n.d.; London, Newnes, 1911; as Phillippa; or. The Wilful Maid, Chicago, M. A. Donohue, 1900.
Lady Norah; or, The Earl’s Heir. New York, F. M. Lupton (Chimney Corner ser. 97), n.d.; as The Earl's Heir; or, Lady Norah, New York, Street & Smith (New Eagle ser. 231), n.d.; Chicago, M. A. Donohue, n.d.; as The Earl's Daughter. London, Hodder & Stoughton, 1910.
Leola Dale's Fortune. New York, F. M. Lupton (Chimney Corner ser. 105), n.d.; New York, Street & Smith (New Ealge ser. 223), 1901; London, Hutchinson, 1910.
The Lady of Darracourt. New York, F. M. Lupton (Chimney Corner ser. 127), n.d.; New York, Street & Smith (Eagle ser.), 1902; London, Hodder & Stoughton, 1911.
Stella Newton. New York, F. M. Lupton (Arm Chair Library 122), n.d.
Married at Sight. New York, G. Munro’s Sons (Laurel Library), 1889.
Elaine. New York, G. Munro’s Sons (Laurel Library 4), 1890; London, Newnes, 1911.
Shadow of Her Life. New York, Grosset & Dunlap, 1890.
Jeanne; or, Barriers Between. New York, F. M. Lupton (Chimney Corner ser. 143), 1890?; as Jeanne; or, Love’s Triumph, New York, Street & Smith (New Eagle ser. 267), 1902.
Who Was the Heir?. New York, F. M. Lupton (Chimney Corner ser. 148), 1890.
Better Than Life. New York, G. Munro’s Sons (Seaside Library 11), 1891; London, Hodder & Stoughton, 1910; as Better Than Life; or, Her Bitter Cup, New York, Street & Smith (Eagle ser. 531), n.d.
On Love's Altar. New York, Munro, 1892; London, R. E. King, 1908; as A Wasted Love; or On Love’s Altar, New York, Street & Smith (Eagle Library 24), 1897; as A Wasted Love; or On Love’s Altar [with Florry’s Lesson], Chicago, M. A. Donohue, 1904; as A Wasted Love; or, On Love’s Altar by Caroline Hart, Cleveland, Arthur Westbrook (Hart ser.), n.d.
A Life's Mistake. New York, G. Munro’s Sons (Laurel Library 19), 1892; London, Hutchinson, 1910.
Once in a Life. New York, G. Munro’s Sons, 1892; London, Hodder & Stoughton, 1910; as Once in a Life; or, The Secret of Her Heart, New York, A. L. Burt, n.d..
Paid For! New York, Munro, 1892; London, Hutchinson, 1909.
In Cupid's Chains. New York, G. Munro’s Sons, 1893; London, Sands, 1902; as In Cupid’s Chains; or, A Slave For Life, New York, Street & Smith (New Eagle ser. 557), 1908.
'Twas Love's Fault. New York, A. L. Burt, 1893; as ‘Twas Love’s Fault; or, A Young Girl’s Trust, New York, Street & Smith (New Eagle ser. 548), n.d.
Queen Kate. New York, G. Munro’s Sons, 1894; London, Hodder & Stoughton, 1909; as Queen Kate; or, A Wilful Lassie, New York, Street & Smith (Eagle ser. 553), n.d.
The Outcast of the Family. New York, A. L. Burt, 1894; as An Outcast of the Family, London, Sands, 1900.
His Guardian Angel; or, Wild Margaret. Chicago, M. A. Donahue, 1894; London, Newnes, 1911.
Only One Love. Chicago, M. A. Donahue (Alert Library 167), n.d. London, Hodder & Stoughton, 1910.
Stella's Fortune; or, Love the Conqueror. Chicago, M. A. Donohue, n.d.; London, Hodder & Stoughton, 1912; New York, Street & Smith, n.d.; as The Sculptor's Wooing, New York, Ogilvie, n.d.
A Woman’s Soul; or, Doris. Chicago, M. A. Donohue (Alert Library 162), n.d.; as A Woman’s Soul: Behind the Footlights, New York, J. S. Ogilvie (Railroad ser. 62), 1900.
A Wounded Heart; or, Sweet as a Rose. Chicago, M. A. Donahue, n.d.; as Sweet as a Rose, London, Hutchinson, 1910.
Just a Girl; or, The Strange Duchess. New York, A. L. Burt, 1895; as The Mistress of Court Regina, New York, Grosset & Dunlap, 1897; London, Hutchinson, 1909; as Just a Girl, illus. Warwick Goble. London, James Bowden, 1898; as An Innocent Girl, New York, Munro, 1898.
The Marquis. New York, G. Munro’s Sons (Laurel Library 21), 1895.
The Price of Honour (as Charles Gibson). Cleveland, Arthur Westbrook, n.d.
She Loved Him. New York, Grosset & Dunlap, 1895; London, Hutchinson, 1909; as Her Right to Love; or, She Loved Him by Caroline Hart, Cleveland, Arthur Westbrook (Hart ser.), n.d.
By Devious Ways. New York, Grosset & Dunlap, 1896.
A Coronet of Shame. New York, G. Munro’s Sons (Laurel Library 30), 1896; London, Sands & Co., 1900.
His Love So True. New York, Munro, 1896.
Heart for Heart; or. Love’s Queer Pranks. New York, A. L. Burt, 1897.
Sydney. A wilful young woman. New York, Street & Smith (Eagle ser. 70), 1897?
The Story of a Passion. New York, G. Munro’s Sons (Laurel Library 33), 1898; London, Hutchinson, 1908.
A Modern Juliet; or, The Unknown Future. New York, G. Munro’s Sons (Laurel Library 39), 1898; New York, A. L. Burt, 1898; London, Pearson, 1910.
Nell of Shorne Mills; or, One Heart’s Burden. New York, A. L. Burt, 1898; London, Hutchinson, 1908.
A Sample of Prejudice. New York, G. Munro’s Sons, 1898.
A Heritage of Hate; or, A Change of Heart. New York, A. L. Burt, 1899; London, Amalgamated Press, 1909.
Love's Dilemma; or, Kate Meddon’s Lover. Chicago, M. A. Donahue, 1900; London, Hodder & Stoughton, 1917; as Love’s Dilemma; or, For an Earldom, New York, Street & Smith (Eagle ser. 280), n.d.; as For an Earldom, New York, Ogilvie, n.d.
Love, The Tyrant. New York, G. Munro’s Sons (Laurel Library 43), 1900; London, Hutchinson, 1905.
Nance. London, Sands, 1900.
At Love's Cost; or, Her Rival’s Triumph. New York, A. L. Burt, 1900?; London, Hutchinson, 1909.
Farmer Holt's Daughter. New York, Federal Book Co., 1901.
Maida: A Child of Sorrow. New York, A. L. Burt, 1901.
Only a Girl's Love. New York, Street & Smith, 1901; London, Hodder & Stoughton, 1911; abridged (by Barbara Cartland), New York, Bantam Books, 1980.
With All Her Heart; or, Love Begets Faith. New York, A. L. Burt, 1901; London, Newnes, 1910.
Diana: For Her Only. New York, G. Munro’s Sons, 1902; as For Her Only, New York, Street & Smith, 1902; London, Hodder & Stoughton, 1911.
The Ashes of Love; or, Fickle Fortune. New York, J. S. Ogilvie (Railroad ser. 56), 1901?; in 2 vols. as The Ashes of Love, New York, Street & Smith (New Eagle ser. 360), n.d., and A Heart Triumphant, New York, Street & Smith (New Eagle ser. 361), n.d.
Iris; or, A Martyred Love. New York, Street & Smith (New Eagle ser. 257), 1902?; London, Newnes, 1914; as A Martyred Love; or, The Heiress of Revels, Chicago, M. A. Donohue, 1902.
The Heir of Vering; or, The Queen Lily. New York, Street & Smith (New Eagle ser. 296), 1902; London, Hutchinson, 1910.
Woman's Soul. New York, Street & Smith, 1902.
The Spring-Time of Love. New York, G. Munro’s Sons, 1902; London, Hodder & Stoughton, 1910; as So Nearly Lost; or, Springtime of Love. New York, Street & Smith, n.d.
So Fair, So False; or, A Soul’s Devotion. New York, Street & Smith (New Eagle ser. 272), 1902; as So Fair, So False; or. The Beauty of the Season, Chicago, M. A. Donohue, n.d.
My Lady Pride. New York, Street & Smith (New Eagle ser. 283), 1902.
Olivia; or, It was for Her Sake. New York, G. Munro’s Sons (Laurel Library), 1902?; New York, Street & Smith (New Eagle ser. 268), 1902.
Kyra's Fate; or, Love Knows No Bonds. New York, A. L. Burt, 1902; London, Hutchinson, 1908.
The Usurper; or, Her Humble Lover. Chicago, M. A. Donohue (Laurel Library 110), 1902; as Her Humble Lover, Cleveland, Arthur Westbrook (All Star ser. 45), 1904.
A Wounded Heart; or, Sweet as a Rose. New York, J. S. Ogilvie (Railroad ser. 66), 1902.
Woven on Fate's Loom, and The Snowdrift. New York, Street & Smith (New Eagle ser. 312), 1903; as Woven on Fate’s Loom [with Florry’s Lesson by M. T. Caldor], New York, F. P. Lupton (Leisure Hour Library 40), 1904.
The Spider and the Fly; or, An Undesired Love: Violet. New York, J. S. Ogilvie (Charles Garvice ser. 22), 1903.
Staunch of Heart; or, Adrien Leroy’s Sacrifice. New York, Street & Smith (Eagle ser. 318), 1903; as Adrien Leroy, London, Newnes, 1912; Cleveland, Arthur Westbrook (All Star ser. 1), n.d.
Staunch as a Woman; or, Love’s Woe. New York, Street & Smith (New Eagle ser. 304), 1903; London, Hodder & Stoughton, 1910.
Led by Love (sequel to “Staunch as a Woman”). New York, Streeet & Smith (New Eagle ser. 305), 1903.
Linked by Fate; or, Not to be Bought. New York, A. L. Burt, 1903; London, Hutchinson, 1905.
The Verdict of the Heart. © 1903; London, Newnes, 1912; [with “Farmer Holt’s Daughter”] New York, Street & Smith (New Eagle ser. 630), 1909.
A Girl of Spirit; or, Bound By Honor. New York, A. L. Burt, 1904; London, Hutchinson, 1906; New York, Street & Smith (New Eagle ser. 640), 1909.
A Jest of Fate; or, Love’s Supreme Effort. New York, Munro, 1904; London, Newnes, 1909.
Love Decides. London, Hutchinson, 1904.
The Pride of Her Life. New York, Street & Smith (New Eagle ser. 367), 1904.
Won by Love’s Valor (sequel to “The Pride of Her Life”). New York, Street & Smith (New Eagle ser. 368), 1904.
Creatures of Destiny; or, Where Love Leads. New York, A. L. Burt, 1905.
Edna's Secret Marriage; or. Love’s Champion. New York, A. L. Burt, 1905.
She Trusted Him. New York, Grosset & Dunlap, 1905.
Love and a Lie. New York, A. L. Burt, c.1905?; as Love and a Lie; or, The Heart of the Other Woman, New York, Street & Smith (New Eagle ser. 712), 1907.
The Other Woman. New York, Street & Smith, 1905.
When Love Meets Love; or, Cynthia’s Reward. New York, Street & Smith (New Eagle ser. 458), 1906.
Diana's Destiny. New York, A. L. Burt, 1905; as Diana and Destiny, London, Hodder & Stoughton, 1906; as Diana’s Destiny; or, Won By Faith, New York, Street & Smith (New Eagle ser. 650), 1909.
Where Love Leads. London, Hutchinson, 1907.
When Love Is Young. New York, A. L. Burt, 1907; as When Love Was Young; or, The Crooked Way. New York, Street & Smith (New Eagle ser. 671), 1910.
The Gold in the Gutter. London, Hutchinson, 1907; as Gold in the Gutter; or, A Love Unfolded, New York, Street & Smith (New Eagle ser. 679) 1910.
Slave of the Lake. Chicago, Stein, 1908.
Taming of Princess Olga. Chicago, Stein, 1908.
Woman Decides. Chicago, Stein, 1908.
My Lady of Snow. Chicago, Stein, 1908.
Linnie. Chicago, Stein, 1908.
Olivia and Others. London, Hutchinson, 1908.
A Love Comedy; or, Behind the Scenes. Chicago, Stein, 1908; London, Hodder & Stoughton, 1912.
Marcia Drayton. London, Newnes, 1908.
The Female Editor of the “Milchester Trumpet”. Chicago, Max Stein (Atlantic Library), 1908.
Leave Love to Itself. Chicago, Stein, 1908.
The First and Last. Chicago, Max Stein (Atlantic Library), 1908.
In the Matter of a Letter. Chicago, Stein, 1908.
The Rugged Path. London, Hodder & Stoughton, 1908.
In Wolf's Clothing. London, Hodder & Stoughton, 1908.
Sacrifice to Art. Chicago, Max Stein, 1909.
The Scribblers' Club. London, Hodder & Stoughton, 1909.
The Fatal Ruby. London, Hodder & Stoughton, 1909; New York, Donald W. Newton, 1909.
By Dangerous Ways. London, Amalgamated Press, 1909; New York, A. L. Burt, n.d.
A Fair Imposter. London, Newnes, 1909.
Barriers Between. London, Hodder & Stoughton, 1910.
The Beauty of the Season. London, Hodder & Stoughton, 1910.
Dulcie. London, Hodder & Stoughton, 1910.
A Girl from the South. London, Cassell, 1910; as A Girl from the South; or, In Love’s Hands, New York, Street & Smith (New Eagle ser. 721), 1911.
The Heart of a Maid. London, Hodder & Stoughton, 1910; as The Heart of a Maid; or, By Love’s Still Waters, New York, Street & Smith (New Eagle ser. 749), 1911.
Floris. London, Hutchinson, 1910.
Signa's Sweetheart. London, Hutchinson, 1910.
Miss Estcourt. London, Hutchinson, 1911; as Miss Estcourt; or, Olive, New York, Street & Smith (New Eagle ser. 778), 1912.
My Love Kitty. London, Hutchinson, 1911; as My Love Kitty; or, Her Heart’s Bondage, New York, Street & Smith (New Eagle ser. 775), 1912.
That Strange Girl. London, Hutchinson, 1911.
Violet. London, Hutchinson, 1911.
Doris. London, Newnes, 1911.
He Loves Me, He Loves Me Not. London, Hodder & Stoughton, 1911; in two vols., as He Loves Me; or, The Fatal Mistake, New York, Street & Smith (New Eagle ser. 327), n.d., and He Loves Me Not, New York, Street & Smith (New Eagle ser. 328), n.d.
Lord of Himself. London, Hodder & Stoughton, 1911.
The Other Girl. London, Hodder & Stoughton, 1911.
Wicked Sir Dare. Cleveland, Arthur Westbrook (Hart ser. 87), 1911; London, C. A. Pearson, 1917.
The Woman in It. London, Hodder & Stoughton, 1911; New York, Street & Smith (New Eagle ser. 758), 1911.
Breta's Double. New York, Street & Smith, n.d.
Imogene. New York, Street & Smith, n.d.
Love for a Day. Philadelphia, Royal Publishing Co. (Charles Garvice ser. 19), n.d.
Love of a Life Time. Philadelphia, Royal, n.d.
Lucille. Chicago, M. A. Donohue, n.d.
Out of the Past. New York, Street & Smith, n.d.
The Price of Honor. Philadelphia, Royal, n.d.; as The Price of Honor; or, Beyond Compare, Cleveland, Arthur Westbrooks (All Star ser. 39), n.d.
The Royal Signet. Philadelphia, Royal, n.d.
Wasted Love. New York, Street & Smith, n.d.
Nellie. New York, Street & Smith (New Eagle ser. 777), n.d. London, Hutchinson, 1913.
Love in a Snare. London, Hodder & Stoughton, 1912.
Fate. London, Newnes, 1912; New York, Ogilvie, 1913.
Fickle Fortune. London, Newnes, 1912.
In Fine Feathers. London, Hodder & Stoughton, 1912.
Two Maids and a Man. London, Hodder & Stoughton, 1912; as Two Girls and a Man, London, Wright and Brown, 1937.
Country Love. London, Hutchinson, 1912.
Reuben. London, Hutchinson, 1912.
The Girl Who Was True; or, A Change of Heart. New York, Street & Smith (New Eagle ser. 818), 1913.
The Irony of Love; or, A Fatal Repentance. New York, Street & Smith (New Eagle ser. 826), 1913.
The Loom of Fate. London, Newnes, 1913.
The Woman's Way. London, Hodder & Stoughton, 1914.
The Call of the Heart, A tale of eighty years since. London, Hodder & Stoughton, 1914.
In Exchange for Love. London, Hodder & Stoughton, 1914.
The One Girl in the World. London, Hodder & Stoughton, 1915; in 2 vols. as The One Girl in the World; or, A Love Triumphant, New York, Street & Smith (New Eagle ser. 978), n.d., and His Priceless Jewel, New York, Street & Smith (New Eagle ser. 979), n.d.
Love, the Adventurous. London, Hodder & Stoughton, 1917.
The Waster. London, Lloyds, 1918.
The Girl in Love. London, Skeffington, 1919.

Omnibus
Four Complete Novels (contains: Just a Girl, On Love’s Altar, A Jest of Fate, Adrien Leroy). London, 1931.

Novels as Caroline Hart
Lil, The Dancing Girl. Cleveland, Arthur Westbrook (Hart ser. 3), 1909.
Women Who Came Between. Cleveland, Arthur Westbrook (Hart ser. 5), 1909.
Nameless Bess; or, The Triumph of Innocence. Cleveland, Arthur Westbrook (Hart ser. 12), 1909.
That Awful Scar; or, Uncle Ebe’s Will. Cleveland, Arthur Westbrook (Hart ser.), 1909.
Vengeance of Love. Cleveland, Arthur Westbrook, 1909?
Redeemed by Love. Cleveland, Arthur Westbrook (Hart ser. 26), 1910
A Hidden Terror; or. The Freemason’s Daughter. Cleveland, Arthur Westbrook (Hart ser. 36), 1910.
Madness of Love. Cleveland, Arthur Westbrook (Hart ser. 48), 1910?
A Working-Girl's Honor; or. Elsie Brandon’s Aristocratic Lover. Cleveland, Arthur Westbrook (Hart ser. 50), 1911.
A Woman Wronged; or, The Secret of a Crime. Cleveland, Arthur Westbrook (Hart ser. 69), 1911.
Angela's Lover. Cleveland, Arthur Westbrook, 1911.
From Worse Than Death. Cleveland, Arthur Westbrook (Hart ser. 105), 1912?
A Strange Marriage. Cleveland, Arthur Westbrook (Hart ser. 110), 1912.
For Love or Honor. Cleveland, Arthur Westbrook, n.d.
From Want to Wealth. Cleveland, Arthur Westbrook, n.d.
Game of Love. Cleveland, Arthur Westbrook, n.d.
Haunted Life. Cleveland, Arthur Westbrook, n.d.
Hearts of Fire. Cleveland, Arthur Westbrook, n.d.
Lillian's Vow. Cleveland, Arthur Westbrook, n.d.
Little Princess. Cleveland, Arthur Westbrook, n.d.
Love's Rugged Path. Cleveland, Arthur Westbrook, n.d.
Nobody's Wife. Cleveland, Arthur Westbrook, n.d.
Rival Heiresses. Cleveland, Arthur Westbrook, n.d.
She Loved Not Wisely. Cleveland, Arthur Westbrook, n.d.
The Woman Who Came Between. Cleveland, Economy Books League, 1933.

Collections
My Lady of Snow and other stories. New York. G. Munro’s Sons (Laurel Library 59), 1900?
The Girl Without a Heart and other stories. London, Newnes, 1912.
A Relenting Fate and other stories. London, Newnes, 1912.
All Is Not Fair in Love and other stories. London, Newnes, 1913.
The Tessacott Tragedy and other stories. London, Newnes, 1913.
The Millionaire’s Daughter and other stories. New York, Street & Smith (New Eagle ser. 982), 1915.
The Girl at the 'bacca Shop. London, Skeffington, 1920.
Miss Smith's Fortune and other stories. London, Skeffington, 1920.

Verse
Eve and other verses. Privately printed, 1873.

Non-fiction
A Farm in Creamland. A book of the Devon countryside. London, Hodder & Stoughton, 1911; New York, Doran, 1912.

Others
The Red Budget of Stories, edited by Garvice. London, Hodder & Stoughton, 1912.

Plays
The Fisherman's Daughter (produced London, 1881).
Marigold, with Allan F. Abbott (produced Glasgow, 1914).

(* Photograph of Garvice from Life © Time Inc.; the photograph of Moorlands was found here.)

7 comments:

Steve Lewis said...

Only a dozen of Garvice's novel and story collections are included in Al Hubin's CRIME FICTION IV. Are you familiar enough with his work to be able to say if some of the others should be there, even if only marginally?

PS. I missed the long bibliography at the end of this masterful (as usual) summing up!

Steve said...

Hi Steve,

Truth is, it was already late and given the choice of trying to put together a listing of Garvice's 180 books or going to bed, I chose the latter. I'll see if I can cobble something together for you, although I'm no expert on his work.

Steve Lewis said...

180 books? A wise decision! I confess to having never read of Garvice until your post on him. Now I'm intrigued.

Maybe even to the extent of reading one of his books, many of which I see are available for free online.

I have a feeling that only one may be all I need, though.

Steve Lewis said...

Regarding the bibliography: Wow. Yeoman's work indeed. Thanks!

Now to find one to read...

Steve

Steve said...

Hi Steve,

There are various titles online, some listed at The Online Books Page and more at Open Library.

Stephen Balbach said...

If you have not read it, I recommend the essay by Laura Sewell Matter, "Pursuing The Great Bad Novelist", Georgia Review, Fall 2007 - it was included in the "Best Creative Nonfiction 2008". It's about her journey of discovery of Garvice after a leaf from his novel washes up on the beach, serendipitously starting a journey of inward and outward discovery about Garvis, and herself.

susan said...

Hello Steve. I am a great grandaughter of charles garvice. My father, Charles Kendale was the son of Basil Garvice and Margery (cossentine) My father passed away septeber 1999. He had 3 daughters, Susan, Valerie,Deborah and a son John Charles garvice. It is great to see yur interest in Charles Garvice and Ive learned alot thru your ifo.

susan oakford(garvice)